Mason Monday–Lids and Cork Sheets

Hi everyone! I am back today with another “Mason Monday” project, and this one involves using wide mouth lids and bands. No jars; just the lids. I have been working on this idea for almost a week now, and it really started out as an experiment.

Top of sample coaster_1.jpg

Side view of sample coaster_1.jpg

I have a set of these coasters, and I love the combination of the galvanized metal and the cork and how striking the embossed white seashell looks against the cork background. I have always been curious as to whether I could duplicate this design using mason jar lids as the base, and, since I could use some coasters for our outdoor seating area, I decided it was time to find out.

Before I could even start this project, I needed to make sure that I had stamp images that were proportional to the size of the cork circles, and that I could emboss these images on to the cork. I would have loved to use seashells, but all of my shell stamps were way too small. I did find a set of chair images that looked like they might be large enough, so now it was time to see if the detailed images would emboss well on the cork. I am happy to report that the embossing went well, and here is what the chair images looked like on the cork circles:

Embossing on cork_1.jpg

I really thought that the uneven surface of the cork would make it difficult to pick up the fine details of each of these chairs, but that wasn’t the case at all! You can see each image very clearly. I’m so excited! This project was dependent on being able to emboss on cork, and now that I have accomplished that, I can start working on the jar lids.

Here is a picture of the adhesives and paints I used on the mason jar lids:

Paint and adhesive used_1.jpg

I started by gluing the lids to the bands with E6000 adhesive. I tried hot glue first, but it was too thick and bulky. Once the lids were secure, I whitewashed each lid with the white chalk paint.

lids whitewashed_1.jpg

I then applied a thin coat of the vintage chalk paint, making sure to leave areas of the white paint exposed. I wanted the lids to have a distressed, worn look. Once the paint was dry, I adhered a plain cork circle to the bottoms of the lids for furniture protection.

Lids with final painting_1.jpg

I couldn’t wait to put the embossed cork circles inside the jar lids to see how they would look!

Inside of coasters _1.jpg

I liked the contrast of the embossed cork against the paint color, but these coasters needed something else; they lacked personality and charm. I turned my room upside down and tried all kinds of things, and here is what I finally came up with:

Coasters with lace and roses_1.jpg

All it took was some lace and tiny, satin roses to take these coasters from “bland to grand”, and now they have the personality and charm that they were lacking. I used the fine-tip glue pen pictured above to attach the lace to the lids.

Coasters outside_1.jpg

I finally have coasters for our outdoor seating area, and they couldn’t be more sweet and charming! They are ready for some sittin’ and sippin’, and I can’t wait to use them.

This has been a fun experiment and project to work on, and I’m glad you could join me to see how these coasters turned out. Have a great couple of weeks, and I will see you back here after vacation. Take care, and, as always, remember:

“May the waves kiss your feet; the sand be your seat; and your friends out-number the stars”.

-C-

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Happy May Day!

Welcome back to my second post for today!

I know that May Day isn’t celebrated as it was when I was growing up, but I have such fond memories of making and delivering baskets to my friends’ doorsteps that I have decided to keep the tradition alive for my own enjoyment.

If you’re not familiar with the tradition of May Day baskets, I go into quite a bit of detail in my very first blog post here so I won’t repeat myself now. Instead, I’d like to get right into this year’s project. Since the treats set the tone for the entire theme, I’m going to start there and end with the basket.

I chose to make sugar cookies for my treats this year, but not just any sugar cookie–I made Swig Sugar Cookies. Have you heard of them? I saw the recipe several years ago on a blog I follow, and I have been wanting to find a time to make them ever since. These cookies were started by a bakery in St. George, Utah and are reported to be the best sugar cookie known to man. It’s said that the magic of these cookies is that the cookies are cold and the frosting is at room temperature. What intrigued me the most is the cookie’s shape–it reminds me of a flower and with the pale pink frosting, I  think they are really pretty.

After you make the dough, you roll it into balls. Then you dip the bottom of a glass into some sugar and flatten out each ball, which gives each cookie it’s signature shape and creates a well for the frosting.

Flattened cookies_1.jpg

Even after baking, the cookies retain their shape:

Cookies after baking_1

The frosting is tinted with one drop of red food coloring, and I just love the pale pink color. Don’t you just love how the cookies look once they are frosted?

Frosted cookies_1

I think they are such pretty cookies, and they really do look like flowers. Now that I had the cookies made, it was time to focus on the basket.

I already knew what basket I was going to make, as I had saved the directions to a basket I had seen online several months ago. I thought it would be the perfect size for my cookies. I spent quite a bit of time picking out the colors and the designer paper for this basket, as it was important that the basket be as pretty and sweet as the cookies were. I ended up using the same patterned paper that was used in the online tutorial, as the floral pattern and the colors matched the cookies perfectly.

Basic basket_1.jpg

The basic basket is a 4 x 4 box with 3/4″ flaps on all sides. The fun part comes when you add on 1″ strips of paper going both directions.

Basket with strips_1.jpg

The ends of the strips get attached just underneath the top flaps and create these arched slats. Here is a front and side view of the slats:

arch of strips_1.jpg

Side view of strip arch_1.jpg

Once you have all of the paper strips attached at the top, you fold the flaps down.

Flaps folded down_1.jpg

All that was left to do was add the handle, which I edged on both sides with lace for some added charm.

Basket tag added_1.jpg

I kept the tag simple, so that the basket shape and colors could really stand out.

Basket tag_1.jpg

Ta da–I present to you my May Day basket for 2016! I love the shape and details of this basket, and I think it’s the perfect basket to hold my sugar cookie treats. Here’s what it looked like with the cookies inside:

Basket ready to go_1

The sugar cookie recipe makes a lot of cookies–71 to be exact–so I still have a lot of cookies left over. As an additional surprise, I have another packaging idea for cookies for you that doesn’t involve a handmade basket.

I decided to make a paper backing for the cookies that would hold the cookies in place inside a cellophane bag. This type of packaging would work for any occasion and for any size of cookie. I simply measured the height and width of my cookie, and cut a piece of white paper that was 2 1/2″ longer and just as wide as my cookie. My cookies were 3 x 3, so my paper was 5 1/2″ x 3. I scored the bottom at 1/2″ and 1 1/2″. Once the paper is folded on those score lines, it will create a cradle for the cookies. I decorated my paper backing with stamped flowers in pastel colors, made a tag by stamping a small doily with coordinating images, and this is what the final set looked like:

Cookie backing and tag_1

I’m sure this all makes more sense, now that you have a visual! I took a picture of the cookies sitting the backing before I package them up, as the glare from the cellophane bag makes it difficult to see everything clearly.

Cookies on backing_1

You can see that I added a piece of patterned paper to the bottom flap of the backing, as otherwise it would have been white.

Cookies all packaged up_1

You could make this packaging even simpler by using patterned paper for the backing instead of stamping designs of plain paper.

Before I close, I thought I would pass along the links for the cookie recipe and the basket pattern in case you are interested to try either or both yourself.

Well, this has been quite a day here at “Made By The C”! An anniversary and May Day, all in the same day! I hope you’ve enjoyed my projects today, and, as always, remember:

“May the waves kiss your feet, / the sand be your seat, / and your friends out-number the stars.”

-C-

 

Unexpected Inspiration

Today’s project started at Home Depot……

With this display……

Home Depot display

I am always on the lookout for interesting seasonal gift items to have on hand for whenever the need or opportunity arises, and when I saw these seed pods, I knew I had just found that “perfect little something” for my springtime gifts. I was so excited! It’s not everyday that you find such a fun and unique product! I thought that the herb pods would be the most versatile and appealing, so I purchased 2 of them and left the store with a big smile on my face.

Now for the fun part–the packaging! The packaging is just as important as the gift, and it is one of my most favorite things to design. I had already begun to think about all sorts of ideas the minute I saw the display, so I could hardly wait to get home and start creating.

The most challenging part of the project was finding a container to fit the depth of the seed pod. I had initially thought that I would use a flower pot, but the pots I had were either too shallow or too wide at the top. I didn’t have any boxes that were the right size, so I thought about making one, but that was going to require more effort than I really wanted to put into this project. I knew I could use a cellophane bag, but I was reserving that as a last resort– I was really hoping I could come up with something more creative than a bag. The turning point came when I found a package of berry boxes during a final search through all of my gift wrap supplies, and folks, we had a winner. The seed pod fit perfectly in the berry box! With container in hand, the rest of the design came together quickly.

First stage of seed pod packaging_2

I wanted the packaging to have a garden theme in the same yellow and green color scheme found on the pod label. I started out by wrapping the top edge of the berry box with some vintage lace, before adding the strip of patterned paper. I added the lace not only for softness, but to help tone down the vibrant green paper. The flower pattern on the paper and the flower embellishment helped to support the garden theme, and the felt and the tiny button used on the flower helped provide additional softness and charm. The only other thing I wanted to do was add a plant marker before filling the basket with the pod.

Finished seed pod packaging with yellow filler_1

The second most challenging part of the project was choosing what color of shredded filler paper to use in the basket. I had thought all along that I would use brown paper to imitate dirt, but it didn’t even last long enough in the basket for me to snap a picture! Brown was definitely the wrong color. My next choice was yellow, and, while it stayed in the basket long enough for a picture, it too was the wrong color. The only green paper I had wasn’t the right green, so I moved on to white paper, which ended up being the perfect choice. The pod stood out better against the white background, and the white color didn’t compete with or detract from the overall project.

Finished seed pod packaging with white filler_1

I think the plant marker is so sweet, and I can’t decide what I love more–the fonts used on the sentiment or the tiny yellow button and twine bow. I’m so happy with how this packaging turn out; it just makes me smile. Here’s a side view of the basket:

Side view of seed pod packaging_1

This project isn’t done yet, though, as you can’t give a gift without a card, can you? I kept the same color scheme and used some of the same elements to make a coordinating notecard.

Seed pod gift ensemble_1

It would be very easy to tailor this card to any occasion by just changing out the sentiments. It doesn’t get much better than that–a fun and versatile gift with a versatile card design. And to think that this all started at Home Depot, of all places!

I hope you’ve enjoyed your visit today, and I hope my project has put a little extra “spring” in your step. Have a good rest of the week, and, as always, remember:

“May the waves kiss your feet, / the sand be your seat, / and your friends out-number the stars.”

-C-